Tag Archives: Chattahoochee River

Chattahoochee River at Acorn Bluff, Carroll County

Though this beautiful bluff on the Chattahoochee isn’t actually named on maps, it’s located within the site of Chief William McIntosh’s plantation known as Acorn Bluff [Lochau Talofau].

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Filed under --CARROLL COUNTY GA--

Grave of Chief William McIntosh (Tustunnuggee Hutkee), Carroll County

William H. McIntosh, Jr., was born circa 1778 in Coweta, a Lower Creek town in present-day Alabama, to Captain William McIntosh, a Scotsman of Savannah, and Senoya, a Creek of the Wind Clan. He spoke the languages of both his parents and was also known as Tustunnuggee Hutkee (“White Warrior”). The McIntosh family was prominent in early Georgia, and William, Jr., was a first cousin of Governor George Troup. Such connections helped ensure his rise to prominence within tribal and state politics. His loyalty was to the United States above all, at the expense of his own Native American relations. McIntosh married three women: Susannah Coe, a Creek; Peggy, a Cherokee; and Eliza Grierson, a mixed-race Cherokee.

M’Intosh, a Creek Chief by Charles Bird King in History of the Indian Tribes of North America…McKenney & Hall, Philadelphia, 1838, Public domain.

Chief McIntosh’s support of General Andrew Jackson in the Red Stick War and the First Seminole War began a long period of tension between McIntosh and tribal leaders. His signing of the second Treaty of Indian Springs in 1825, which called for the removal of virtually all Creeks from their ancestral lands, precipitated his assassination by a group of Upper Creek Law Menders. On 30 April 1825 Chief Menawa and 200 warriors led a surprise early morning attack on Lockchau Talofau, setting fires around the dwellings and subsequently shooting and stabbing to death McIntosh and Coweta Chief Etomme Tustunnuggee. Ironically, McIntosh had himself supported a provision to the Code of 1818 in which the National Creek Council imposed a sentence of death to those who took ancestral lands without full tribal consent.

His burial stone, placed in 1921 by the Daughters of the American Revolution on the grounds of his plantation, Lochau Talofau, is now accompanied by a standard military-issued headstone, denoting his position and military service. Chief McIntosh achieved the rank of Brigadier General during the Red Stick War, a component of the War of 1812. The birth date of 1775 listed on the headstone is an estimate.

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Filed under --CARROLL COUNTY GA--

Bowen Family Cemetery, 1830s, Carroll County

This fascinating cemetery is located in the McIntosh Reserve Park, a property associated with Chief William McIntosh and maintained as a public park by Carroll County.

The Bowen family were pioneers in this area and likely had some connection to Chief McIntosh, perhaps as traders or through some other association.

The earliest discernible burial in the cemetery dates to 1830.

Though many names have been lost over time, this cemetery is important not only for its historical connection to early settlers but for its limestone slab (or other local stone?) tombs, which are quite rare today.

It’s a well-preserved example of a family burying ground utilizing materials on hand and offers a fascinating glimpse into the funerary practices of early-19th century rural Georgia

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Filed under --CARROLL COUNTY GA--

Chattahoochee River, Helen

At Helen, not far from its source, the Chattahoochee is one of Georgia’s most natural and beautiful rivers.

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Filed under --WHITE COUNTY GA--, Helen GA

Helen to Hardman Heritage Trail

The Helen to Hardman Heritage Trail is one of the nicest walking/hiking trails in Northeast Georgia, following the Chattahoochee River from the edge of downtown Helen to the Hardman Farm State Historic Site.

Much of the prime riverside property was donated to the Trust for Public Land in 2007 by Ted Turner and his foundations, insuring forever its protection from development. The one mile trail (2 miles round trip) is also ADA accessible.

Lush vegetation and pristine river views can be found all along the paved trail. We also found a few bear scratches, so be careful on the trail.

In Helen, access the trail from the parking lot just below the Helen Tubing & Water Park off Edelweiss Strasse.

 

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Filed under --WHITE COUNTY GA--, Helen GA

Chattahoochee River at Fort Gaines

The Chattahoochee River cuts through high bluffs at Fort Gaines to form the border between Georgia and Alabama.

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Filed under --CLAY COUNTY GA--, Fort Gaines GA

Vertical-Lift Bridge, 1969, Omaha

Vertical Lift Bridge Seaboard Coast Line Railroad RR Abandoned Chattahoochee River Omaha GA Alabama Line Picture Image Photograph Copyright © Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2013

Built by Seaboard Air Line, this bridge has been abandoned for years. It’s located between Omaha, Georgia, and Cottonton, Alabama, and is visible from the Georgia Highway 39 Spur. Jackie Purdy writes that there is another vertical-lift bridge operated by CSX on the Savannah River.

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Filed under --STEWART COUNTY GA--, Omaha GA