Tag Archives: Georgia Houses

Shotgun House, Fitzgerald

 

fitzgerald-ga-shotgun-house-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-south-georgia-usa-2011

Though a small rental house for much of its existence, I recall John Henry Dorminy telling my grandmother it was one of the oldest houses standing in the city. It was demolished around 2015.

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Queen Anne House, Reidsville

reidsville ga folk victorian queen anne house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2011

This is an example of vernacular housing with strong Queen Anne features, common with rural builders.

reidsville ga folk victorian house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2011

Ludowici Tile House, Ludowici

ludowici ga tile roof house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2011

Ludowici was founded as a railroad stop (known as Four and a Half) in the 1840s; by 1850 it was known as Johnston Station, after landowner and businessman Allen Johnston. German entrepreneur William Ludowici built the “Dixie” plant of his Ludowici Celadon Company in Johnston Station in 1903, and in 1905 the town was renamed in his honor. Ludowici roofing tile is still manufactured and considered one of the finest such materials available, though it hasn’t originated in Long County in over a century. Just a handful of Ludowici tile roofs survive in the town so linked to their history, but several are well-maintained by owners. This home on Lincoln Sreet, architecturally one of the most interesting surviving, is in critical condition. (Update: As of 2015, this house has been demolished).

Neoclassical Revival House, Hazlehurst

hazlehurst ga neoclassical revival house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2011

Durden House, Hazlehurst

hazlehurst ga durden house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2011

Bill Ringle writes that this was the home of his great-grandfather, Marcus Nathaniel Durden.

Queen Anne House, Nahunta

nahunta ga folk victorian house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2011

 

J. M. Johnson House, Kite

kite ga j m johnson  house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2011

This Queen Anne was the home of J. M. Johnson, a large landowner who built most of the commercial row in Kite. After his death, his daughter, Annie Mae Palmer, lived here until her death.  Later residents were the Sheppards and Garschagens.

Single-Pen Log House, Blackville

blackville ga single pen log house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2011

Tyler Colston writes that as of 2017, this building has collapsed and the lumber is being salvaged for reuse. He also notes: That wasn’t the original location of the cabin. All that land through there was the family’s land . I do know that the log building for the visitor center right off the interstate I-16) was another one of the family’s cabins… The family had a sawmill, grist mill, and did turpentine as well.

Neil Gillis House, Treutlen County

treutlen county ga neil gillis house photograph copyright brian brown vanishing south georgia usa 2011

Bill Ricks writes: This is called the Neil Gillis House on GA 86 at US 221. “Old Man” Neil is the “father of Treutlen County”, as his leadership in the General Assembly led to the creation of the county from Montgomery and Emanuel Counties. His son, “Mr. Jim” Gillis was responsible for the initial paving of most of the roads in Georgia, as he was on the highway board from the 1930s most of the years leading up to the early 70s when Jimmy Carter became governor. I-16, down the hill from this house is named the Jim Gillis Highway.