Cascade Falls Trail, Meriwether County

Cascade Falls, F. D. Roosevelt State Park

The Cascade Falls Trail is part of the Pine Mountain Trail, located within the F. D. Roosevelt State Park. Several waterfalls punctuate the trail, and while they may be small compared to better known waterfalls in North Georgia, they nonetheless provide great views. This post focuses on the trail as hiked from the WJSB-TV tower parking lot, just south of Warm Springs. The round trip to Cascade Falls and back is approximately 4.1 miles and will take about 3 hours with stops.

I’ll share the waterfalls first, since they are the main attraction, and then images from the trail.

Waterfalls of the Cascade Falls Trail, FDR State Park

Csonka Falls, F. D. Roosevelt State Park

Csonka Falls will be the first waterfall you reach on the trail.

Big Rock Falls, F. D. Roosevelt State Park

Big Rock Falls will be the next point of interest. It’s a great spot to take a rest.

Slippery Rock Falls, F. D. Roosevelt State Park

The third waterfall is Slippery Rock Falls, and it is my favorite spot on the trail.

Slippery Rock Falls, F. D. Roosevelt State Park

It’s another good rest stop, but the rocks live up to their name and are indeed quite slippery.

Cascade Falls, F. D. Roosevelt State Park

About 2.1 miles from the trailhead, hikers are at last rewarded with the highlight of the trail, Cascade Falls. Like all the waterfalls along the trail, it’s marked with a wooden sign.

Cascade Falls, F. D. Roosevelt State Park

The pool below the falls is a nice place to cool your feet in the summertime, and to take a rest before returning to the trailhead.

Cascade Falls Trail, F. D. Roosevelt State Park

This easternmost section of the Pine Mountain Trail is popular with hikers for its waterfalls, but the landscape of this area is equally interesting. It’s the most mountainous section of Georgia south of Atlanta.

The first part of the hike crosses relatively flat land.

The topography changes as the trail winds it way toward the falls, following Wolfden Creek, also known as Wolfden Branch.

The creek runs mostly parallel to the trail, but it crosses it 13 times.

One of the interesting features of the trail are the large rocks that seem to litter the woods.

They make good seats if you need to take a break from the walk.

You’ll also likely notice many fallen trees. They’re remnants of a 2011 tornado.

Past Slippery Rock Falls, the trail begins it highest rise.

For casual hikers, it can be a bit of a challenge.

Bumblebee Ridge is the highest point before reaching Cascade Falls, and offers nice views (and a bench).

Plants of Cascade Falls Trail, F. D. Roosevelt State Park

Early Spring is a great time to hike the trail, and you’ll encounter a variety of early wildflowers, and a reptile or two. Be careful of Copperheads, though, as this is prime habitat for the poisonous snakes.

Rhododendron canescens, light variety

Native azaleas were just beginning to bloom and were fairly common along the trail. I was here too early to see the Mountain Laurels, which reach the southern end of their range near here.

Viola pedata

Keep an eye out for one of my favorite native plants, the Bird-Foot Violet.

Oxalis

I found this Oxalis blooming in a crevice between two rocks. I believe it’s a Wood Sorrel, but am not positive as to which species.

Iris verna

A real surprise was this Dwarf, or Spring, Iris.

6 thoughts on “Cascade Falls Trail, Meriwether County

  1. Weazel

    Brian: A welcome change! Have you investigated the crumbling mansions on the hillside behind the Little White House? As it was explained to me by a disgruntled park employee, these beautiful old homes were being maliciously allowed to disintegrate by Republican partisans who want to eradicate the legacy of FDR. It is truly criminal to see such magnificent buildings being allowed to rot for want of a patched roof, all due to political prejudice.

    Reply
  2. Sharon

    Brian, Thank you for sharing your hike with us. I mostly live my life vicariously these days, and can imagine being on the trail with you. Wonderful photos! Nice surprise!

    Reply

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