Category Archives: –WAYNE COUNTY GA–

Captain C. C. Grace House, Circa 1864, Screven

Nine years ago, Lindsay Thomas, Jr., whose family owns and maintains this wonderful Georgia Centennial Farm, reached out to me about photographing the old home place near Screven. Lindsay’s father served in the United States House of Representatives from 1983-1993. Lindsay was very interested in documenting the large number of catface pines and Herty cups on the property. I still haven’t gotten around to making those photographs, but hope to someday soon. [For those not in the know, catfaces are the scars left behind by the collection of pine sap for the manufacture of turpentine. The naval stores business was dominant in this region until at least the 1950s.]

The farm, known as Grace Acres today, was established by Captain C. C. Grace, circa 1864, and the house was likely built around that time. The family has maintained a presence in the area ever since and they’re not only good stewards of the land, but they do a fine job of maintaining this historic home.

Wayne Drug Company Billboard & Barn, Wayne County

I made this photograph in 2011. The sign and barn are still there, but I think the sign is completely faded now. It’s located near Madray Springs on Lanes Bridge Road.

David Reddish Log House, 1850s, Wayne County

This amazing survivor was built as a single-pen log residence in the 1850s by area pioneer David Reddish (1824-1902). Thanks to Mr. Reddish’s great-great granddaughter, Amanda Farmery, for bringing this highly endangered pioneer home to my attention. Mr. Reddish lived in the house until his death in 1902.

The hearth was located on the end pictured above and has collapsed and some of the brick was salvaged or removed.

This view of the interior illustrates the condition of the house, which is so compromised that I wouldn’t even step inside.

Typical of construction of this era in Georgia, the logs are held in place by dovetail joinery.

A rear view of the original section of the house illustrates just how utilitarian structures of this type tended to be in early rural Georgia.

At some point, a board-and-batten addition was made to the house. It’s possible that this was done after Mr. Reddish’s death. Amanda Farmery notes that a well on the property displays a date of 1912, suggesting it continued to be used a residence for some time.

This view from the board-and-batten addition looks toward the original single-pen log section.

Though there is likely no hope for saving the structure, it is wonderful that the family has allowed to stand all these years. I am very grateful to Amanda Farmery for not only recognizing its importance to her family history but her desire for documenting it and sharing it for posterity’s sake.

 

Turpentine Cabin, Tetlow

This is about as good a view as can be had of this shotgun house in northwestern Wayne County. It’s located in the vicinity of Tetlow, which still exists on the map and in a nearby road name, but seems lost to history otherwise. Because there are the remains of several nearly identical shotgun houses at the site, I presume this was a turpentine camp at one time. The area in which its located was heavily involved in the naval stores and timber industries throughout much of the twentieth century; the camp was likely abandoned by the 1960s.

Commissary, Wayne County

This is located near the railroad line between Odessa and Gardi and considering the prevalence of the turpentine industry in the area, it was likely related to that. Thanks to Jackielee Moseley for assistance in the identification.

Hip-Roof Farmhouse, Wayne County

Knight’s Tourist Home, Jesup

I’m not sure when this was built, perhaps the late 1930s or early 1940s, but I believe it was built solely for use as a boarding house/tourist home. It is presently being deconstructed. Jesup once had many such “tourist homes” but by the 1960s most were replaced by modern motels. The Broadhurst Studio postcard (pictured below) likely dates to circa 1945-1950. The card notes the availability of a locked garages and boasts that it is a block away from the noise of highway traffic.