Category Archives: Tarboro GA

Clinch Chapel United Methodist Church, Tarboro

African-Americans have been well-established in the Tarboro community since the days of slavery, and in subsequent years owned land and farms throughout the area. Clinch Chapel traces its origins to an informal congregation organized by Brother Zachery Butler to serve the spiritual needs of enslaved people from the nearby Owens, King, and Clinch plantations. After years of meeting in a brush arbor, the congregation erected a wood frame church in 1896, using trees milled at Ceylon plantation and floated on the Satilla to Owens Ferry, from where they were hauled on oxcarts to this site. The first trustees of the congregation were Josh Washington, Rinea Washington, Henry Robinson, Hanna Robinson, Isaac Johnson, Lucy Nicklow, Pompey Gordon, and Lizzie Gordon.

The new church was destroyed by a storm and reorganized in 1897, and again in 1901, at which time a new structure was constructed. Reverend A. B. Fish was pastor at the time.

During the pastorate of Reverend C. O. Gordon, the church was again reorganized in 1953 and the foundation of the present chapel was laid in 1963. Association with the United Methodist Church began in 1968. According to the cornerstone, the present structure was completed circa 1992. Sarah Small, Jack Small, William D. Small, Sr., Henry Butler, Sr., Calvin Small, Sr., and Joseph Hamilton, Sr., were on the Building Committee.

Clinch Chapel Cemetery

The cemetery at Clinch Chapel contains more than a dozen vernacular memorials, including one of the Madonna monuments detailed here. The following photographs appear in no particular order but serve as examples of the variety of work present. As is the case with all such markers, environmental factors and the passage of time pose the greatest threat to their long-term survival. This is my main reason for documenting them, but I also find them beautiful and moving works of art and have the utmost respect for the love and devotion they represent.

Reverend John Mungin (Birth and death dates unknown)

Reverend Mungin’s headstone features three crosses and is wedge-shaped.

Luevenia Randolph (29 November 1886-1 May 1944). Ms. Randolph’s headstone is of a type found in numerous African-American and white cemeteries, especially rural locations, which simply use a stencil on a poured slab to identify the decedent. Not quite as common, though, are the applied symbols, including shaking hands, hands pointing to Heaven, bibles, and winged heads (cherubim).

Peter Jackson (1888?-29 July 1938)
Addie Mitchell (17 August 1905-6 June 1942)
Unknown. The symbols have obviously been reapplied on this headstone, which is unfortunately unreadable.
Unknown
Solina Glassco (7 November 1874-5 November 1926). This is obviously a commercially produced monument, and a very nice one at that, but I have included it here because it documents an association with a Mosaic Templars lodge. In African-American communities of the time, these lodges often provided low cost burial insurance and in some cases the placement of a headstone. This one indicates that Glassco was a member of the Carrie Bell Chamber 2855, Mosaic Templars of America, which was located at nearby White Oak.

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Pyramidal Roof House, Tarboro

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June 2, 2017 · 10:47 AM

Vernacular House, Tarboro

In the historically African-American communities that dominate the coastal region, utilitarian vernacular forms, such as this gable front example, are the rule.

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Brown’s Chapel A. M. E. Church, Tarboro

Like the other Tarboro churches, this one has a White Oak address due to the post office location. This congregation was established on 7 July 1900 by Reverend T. N. M. Smith, Reverend S. W. Wood, and L. Fatio; the present structure was dedicated in 1979 and has been remodeled since.

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Church for Sale, Tarboro

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June 2, 2017 · 9:30 AM

Oak Grove Missionary Baptist Church, Tarboro

From dates on the cornerstones, I understand that this congregation was originally organized as the First Baptist Church in 1899, with Reverend J. Delk serving as first pastor. Dates also indicate that the congregation changed its name to Oak Grove Missionary Baptist around 1947. The present remodel likely dates to 1991, when a new cornerstone was placed. (Though the church has a White Oak address, it’s located in Tarboro. There’s no post office in Tarboro).

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Tarboro Mercantile

Tarboro Mercantile General Store Feed Seed Country Store Camden County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2014

Tarboro is an isolated community in Camden County’s interior, near White Oak.

 

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Providence Methodist Church, 1856, Tarboro

Wes Cox, who’s now an industrial designer in Brooklyn, related a bit of the history of this church to me some time ago: ...The original Providence Church congregation met in a church on Old Post Road, several miles to the west. In 1856 the congregation moved to this new structure, which was damaged in a hurricane in 1922 I believe. The whole structure leans slightly to the right ever since the hurricane. The original church structure on Old Post Road was much older, and was used by other Methodist congregations until it burned, either in the 1920s or 1930s.

Wes’s grandmother was the church organist here for many years.

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