Category Archives: –BRANTLEY COUNTY GA–

Spring Hill Primitive Baptist Church, Brantley County

Though it is one of the smaller Crawfordite meeting houses I’ve documented, Spring Hill remains an active congregation.

I’m grateful to Brittany Ragan for bringing it to my attention and for sharing the locations of other Crawfordite churches.

Commercial Block, Hoboken

This is the only significant historic commercial structure still standing in Hoboken. The excellent Coca-Cola mural, added in recent years, notes that Georgia’s favorite soft drink has been “refreshing Hoboken since 1905”.

Queen Anne House, Hoboken

This is one of two landmark Queen Anne houses in Hoboken. Both are unusually large examples of the form.

A. P. Brantley House, 1866, Hoboken

This house was built by A. P. Brantley in 1866 and the Queen Anne features were added later. It is thought to be the oldest house in Brantley County.

Hall-and-Parlor Farmhouse, Brantley County

Brantley County Courthouse, 1930, Nahunta

When Brantley County was created in 1920, Hoboken was chosen as the seat of government. After two contested elections voters chose Nahunta to be the new county seat and it was officially recognized as such in 1923. Since this structure, designed by Waycross architect Thomas Jefferson Darling (1868-1943), wasn’t completed until 1930, I presume the courthouse in Hoboken remained in use during the interim.

National Register of Historic Places

 

Philadelphia Wesleyan Church, 1904, Hortense

From the congregational history: In the year 1900 a church was organized at the old Sawgrass School outside of Hortense GA. The “Sawgrass” Church was started as a response to a revival held in the area by Rev. J J Williams.  

In 1904 property across the street from the school was donated to the church. The first building, and still current worship area, is pictured to   the left. Although the nickname “Sawgrass” is how many still know the church, from 1904 on the official name of the church was Philadelphia Wesleyan Methodist Church. 

For a period of time Philadelphia was part of a “circuit”, a group of four churches that were pastored by one person. In this case, Philadelphia was on a circuit with Browntown Wesleyan Methodist, Hortense Wesleyan Methodist, and Oak Grove Wesleyan Methodist. 

In 1968 the Wesleyan Methodist and Pilgrim Holiness denominations merged. As a result, the name of the church became Philadelphia Wesleyan Church. 

The following pastors have led Philadelphia Wesleyan through the years: F L Thornton, W B Lee, M M Strickland, J D Patterson, A G Cornelison, J C Clubb, W B Clubb, F H Harris, H R Gumby, W T Brinson, G H Doty, C M Payne, W L Snellgrove, E L Elford, Rev. Alexander, W G Wagnon, W V Hartley, R C Mathis, Henry Sapp, Thomas Lentz, David Horne, and Ron Stayman. In 2016 the Lord brought our current Pastor, Tim and Karen Johnson, to Philadelphia.