Tag Archives: National Register of Historic Places

Ward’s Pharmacy, Elberton

This local landmark dates to at least the 1940s, and perhaps earlier. And, they still have a soda fountain and hand-dipped ice cream. The Art Deco storefront, once commonly seen on pharmacies and jewelry stores, is largely intact.

Elberton Commercial Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Doug Anderson’s Barber Shop, Elberton

Doug Anderson’s Barber Shop almost looks like a museum but has been a fixture in downtown Elberton for many years. It’s located in the basement of the old First National Bank Building and is a local landmark in itself. You might not be able to see them clearly, as I shot these through windows, but there’s an autographed photo of Brenda Lee, local photos and ephemera, and one of those tongue-in-cheek posters of a Native American promising “hair cuts, guaranteed painless and quick”.

Musician Seth Martin wrote on the Vanishing Georgia Instagram: tons of memories of this spot. First hair cut, Doug’s boots on the granite steps, cokes from old style machine, Hess trucks everywhere, the old tanning booths in the back, Doyle, etc., etc., etc., like a movie…

Susan Crawford adds: Doug Anderson was a piano student of mine in Elberton about 1974-5. He was already an established barber and also played in a band. At that time he drove a 1940s black Chevrolet. He got it when he was in high school and kept it in perfect shape. If he’s still driving it – and he may well be! – it might be worth a picture. Doug was a real gentleman.

My photographs of the shop date to the mid-2010s, but I believe the business is still going strong.

Elberton Commercial Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Bowers House, 1921, Canon

In its secluded setting, the Bowers House is difficult to capture, but that’s the point. It’s been put into service as a literary and creative retreat, in an effort by the family to keep the house while providing writers, artist, and musicians a quiet creative space. The family are descendants of Job Bowers II (31 August 1803-25 June 1888), an abolitionist, religious pacifist, and publisher who brought the Universalist Church to Georgia and laid out the town of Canon in what had originally been known as West Bowersville. Job’s grandfather, Revolutionary War soldier Job Bowers (1755-1779), was one of the earliest settlers of Franklin County. The family were also founders of the nearby town of Bowersville.

It was built as the Canon Hotel during what could be called the town’s boom time, when the railroad kept the mills running and cotton was king. Traders and salesmen were regulars but the property failed in the Great Depression in a region already ravaged by the deleterious effects of the boll weevil. The hotel was converted it into a private home thereafter.

Canon Commercial Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Note: This updates and replaces a post originally published on 22 July 2019.

Baron-York Building, Circa 1875, Clarkesville

Built circa 1875, this is one of two 19th-century commercial buildings surviving in downtown Clarkesville. It is named for V. C. Baron’s Feed & Seed and M. C. York’s dry goods store.

Clarkesville Downtown Square Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Burns-Sutton House, 1901, Clarkesville

This Eclectic/Folk Victorian home was built by local master carpenters Rusk and Cornelius Church for Dr. J. K. Burns. Upon Dr. Burns’s death in 1924, the house was inherited by his daughter, Pauline Sutton, wife of Superior Court judge and Clarkesville mayor I. H. Sutton. Later incarnations include a bed and breakfast and law office.

Washington-Jefferson Street Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

English Vernacular Revival Cottage, 1942, Clarkesville

Washington-Jefferson Street Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Edwards-Tatum House, 1932, Clarkesville

This innovative cross-gable Craftsman cottage is a nice example of the variations of the style.

Washington-Jefferson Street Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Live Oaks of Broadfield Plantation, Glynn County

The grove of Live Oaks (Quercus virginiana) marking the entrance to Hofwyl House and its dependencies at Hofwyl-Broadfield Plantation is one of the great natural public spaces on the Georgia coast.

While the structures are a significant resource, the real attraction for many are the oaks located all over the property. Individually, the trees are objects of awe and wonder; collectively, they’re a natural cathedral.

As is common with many Live Oaks on the coast, some specimens appear to have been uprooted.

These giants are miraculous in their curious ability to grow this way, often living and prospering for centuries.

Spanish Moss is the natural ornament most associated with the Live Oak, and it’s especially abundant here.

There’s also lots of Resurrection Fern (Pleopeltis polypodioides).

Some of these trees are estimated to be between 500-800 years old.

Two are members of the Louisiana Live Oak Society Tree Registry, which documents significant specimens throughout the Southeast.

National Register of Historic Places

Faith Chapel, 1904, Jekyll Island

A non-denominational sanctuary built for the Jekyll Island Club by architect Howard Constable, Faith Chapel is one of the best-known structures in the National Historic Landmark District. It features a window signed and personally installed by Louis Comfort Tiffany and another stained glass panel behind the pulpit depicting the Adoration of the Christ Child designed by Maitland Armstrong and his daughter Helen. The chapel is well-maintained today and is often used for weddings and open for tours at times.

The gargoyles are a copy of those found at Notre Dame de Paris.

Jekyll Island Historic District, National Register of Historic Places + National Historic Landmark

Villa Ospo, 1927, Jekyll Island

Villa Ospo was one of the last structures built in the Jekyll Island Club era. It took its name from the Guale word for either the island, or a village thereon, and has Spanish Eclectic and Italian Renaissance elements.

It was built by architect John Russell Pope* for Walter Jennings (14 September 1858-9 January 1933). Jennings was a member of Skull and Bones at Yale, a Columbia Law School classmate of Theodore Roosevelt, and director of Standard Oil of New Jersey. He was a student of history, as well, and helped successfully lobby the Georgia legislature to correct the long-used spelling ‘Jekyl’ to ‘Jekyll’, as it should have been all along since Oglethorpe named the island for Sir Joseph Jekyll.

*-Notably, Pope was also the architect of the Jefferson Memorial and the National Gallery of Art].

Jennings died here on 9 January 1933. He and his wife were injured in an automobile accident on Oglethorpe Road on 4 January and though a heart attack was listed as his cause of death, it’s possible this was brought on from injuries sustained in the accident.

Jekyll Island Historic District, National Register of Historic Places + National Historic Landmark