Tag Archives: Georgia Architecture

Turner House, 1916, McDonough

The Turner House is one of the architectural standouts of McDonough and is a beautifully maintained property. Were it not for the buttresses, I would consider it a Prairie Style house; I suppose it falls somewhere in the Renaissance Revival.

Lawrenceville Street Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Henry P. Copeland House, 1903, McDonough

Like many of the older houses in McDonough’s historic district, this Neoclassical Revival landmark is now used as a business office.

McDonough Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

English Vernacular Revival Cottage, 1941, McDonough

McDonough Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

McDonough Presbyterian Church, 1922

The McDonough Presbyterian Church was established in August 1827 with 25 members. Reverend James A. Gamble was the first minister. This church, built in 1922, replaced an earlier structure built in 1890. It served the congregation until 1974, when a new church was built at another location.

McDonough Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Henry County Courthouse, 1897, McDonough

Golucke & Stewart designed this courthouse in the Richardsonian Romanesque style, which they also employed in the plans of the Schley, Union, and Madison county courthouses. Though its appearance has been altered by expansions over the years, it remains a focal point of downtown McDonough.

National Register of Historic Places

First United Methodist Church, 1911, Lithonia

Lithonia First United Methodist Church was established on 14 October 1860 as Lithonia Methodist Episcopal Church, South, with the Reverend Newdaygate B. Ousley serving as first pastor. As with so many Georgia churches, Lithonia UMC began services in a brush arbor and then built a one-room meeting house for services. In 1911, the present structure was dedicated and has served the congregation ever since. It was designed by local born architect John Parks Almand and used local Lithonia granite in its design. Almand left Georgia soon after he designed this church and began his practice in Little Rock, Arkansas. [Interestingly, this church does not appear on most lists of Almand’s work. I don’t know the reason for this oversight.]

Lithonia Historic District, National Register of Historic Places & Arabia Mountain National Heritage Area

Antioch Baptist Church, 1911, Lithonia

Established by a group of Freedmen in 1869, Antioch-Lithonia Missionary Baptist Church [known originally as Antioch Baptist Church] is thought to be the oldest African-American congregation in Lithonia and DeKalb County. The church first met in a brush arbor and built their first permanent structure circa 1871. It was replaced by this structure, clad in local stone, in 1911, and served the congregation until 2004, when a larger facility was built at another location.

Reverend Adam Daniel Williams, the maternal grandfather of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., served the congregation at one time.

Lithonia Historic District, National Register of Historic Places & Arabia Mountain National Heritage Area

Eclectic House, 1882, Conyers

This recently restored Conyers landmark features distinct styles. The street entrance, seen above, has a Greek Revival appearance, while the rear wing has Folk Victorian elements.

Conyers Residential Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Porter-Rogers-Tuck House, 1903, Covington

Floyd Street Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Daniel-Mixon House, 1845, Covington

This house likely originated as a small cottage with expansions over the years resulting in its present appearance.

Floyd Street Historic District, National Register of Historic Places