Category Archives: Lowery GA

Lowery Cemetery, Laurens County

I’m always looking for places associated with my Browning ancestors, and while I’m not the best genealogist, much of my family history has already been traced by others. I came across this historic cemetery by accident, but was amazed to find many of the Browning family represented here. While the majority of headstones are formal, these sandstone/limestone versions are rare and wonderful examples of vernacular funerary art. Their biggest enemy is time and weather, as the names are beginning to vanish.

Silas Browning (19 January 1819-19 December 1888)

Silas was the son of George Browning and was married to Sara Wolfe. They had six daughters and one son.

Teresa Jane Lowery Gay (25 October 1820-15 April 1885)

The headstone is unique in shape in comparison with the other examples in the cemetery.

Sallie Reddin (July 1880-?)

There are spelling errors on some of the headstones, as is common with vernacular examples, and Sallie Reddin could have been Sallie Redding. That’s just a guess. Her death date is not present, but since these stones all date to the 1880s, it’s safe to presume Sallie died as a young child.

Unknown Browning

I can read the word “Browning” on this stone, but all the other details have nearly vanished.

Caroline Vaughn Browning (13 April 1823-9 April 1887)

This stone features a primitive illustration, unique in the cemetery.

Unknown Browning, possibly Sissy (2? September 18??-?? September 188?)

This stone may be readable to some. I believe I can see the word “Sissy”, but the birth and death dates are very difficult to ascertain.

Mathew Cadwell (14 December 1858-3 August 1886)

I’ve included this stone for its curiosity. It isn’t related to the vernacular stones but tells a sad story. It states that young Mr. Cadwell was “Killed By Lighting with His Horse Under Him”.

Commissary, Laurens County

This commissary near the Lowery community was likely related to the turpentine industry and according to a Laurens County Historic Resources survey dates to circa 1910-1920.