Tag Archives: Georgia Murals

Frank & Co. Dry Goods Mural, Savannah

I love seeing old murals around Savannah. They often bring character to otherwise easily overlooked places. Frank & Co. was a thriving dry goods wholesaler in late-19th-century Savannah.

Savannah National Historic Landmark District

Coca-Cola Mural, Warrenton

I’m not sure how old this mural is, or if it’s just a replacement of an earlier version, but it’s typical of similar “ghost” murals found all over Georgia. They appear from time to time, sometimes after being hidden for decades.

Richards Building, 1898, Jasper

This marble-front commercial block was built by Drs. F. C. and W. A. Richards. The Coca-Cola mural on the side of the building was restored in recent years.

Jesse “Lone Cat” Fuller Mural, Jonesboro

Jesse “Lone Cat” Fuller isn’t well known today, outside music circles, but he should be. The itinerant bluesman left his native Jonesboro after a childhood typical of Black Georgians of his day and after a series of manual labor jobs in various states, wound up in California circa 1920. He worked as a shoe-shine man outside the United Artists studio in Hollywood and was a favorite of Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., who helped set him up with a hot dog stand. He also got him work as an extra, in such notable films as Thief of Baghdad. With the money he saved from that enterprise, he moved to Oakland and began working for the Southern Pacific Railroad. When his railroad job ended after World War II, he went back to shining shoes, singing as he worked, and gained notice from musicians in the burgeoning Folk movement who were then flocking to the Bay Area. Due to his exposure in local bars and cafes, he recorded his first album in 1958. He had trouble finding, or paying, other musicians to back him up; as a result he invented the fotdella, a six-string bass, rigged with a cymbal. He also invented a rack to hold his harmonica and kazoo. He was a one-man band. Bob Dylan supposedly adopted his harmonica rig after listening to Fuller and recorded his song “You’re No Good” on his first album.

Fuller gained notoriety for “San Francisco Bay Blues”, which was covered by numerous artists including the Grateful Dead, Janis, Joplin, Jim Croce, and Eric Clapton.

The mural, by Shannon Lake, is a nice tribute to this influential artist.

Scarlett O’Hara Mural, Jonesboro

Clayton County calls itself “The Home of Gone With the Wind” and signs of its connection to the popular movie and book abound in Jonesboro. Perhaps one of the boldest statements is this mural (circa 2018) by Shannon Lake featuring film heroine Scarlett O’Hara [a la Vivien Leigh, because that’s how nearly everyone sees her]. It’s brilliantly paired with one of her most famous utterances, “Fiddle Dee Dee!”

Arts Center Mural, Lithonia

This colorful mural was a source of controversy because it didn’t get the proper permits. Apparently, it has been completed. It was designed by Steve Paul, founder of the Lithonia Arts Center, and much of the work was by members of the community. I won’t get into local politics, but I think the community should embrace it.

General Store, Taylor County

I haven’t been able to identify this store, yet, but it has one of the coolest signs (below).

It reads: Try your “LUCK FISHING”. There’s a nice pond nearby.

Willie Harris Grocery Store, 1969, Hilltop

This store was also known as Hill Top Groceries.

Though it closed a few years ago, it has been preserved as a community landmark.

Obelisk Flour Ghost Mural, Moultrie

Moultrie Commercial Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Mr. Fish Fry King, Cordele

This a soul food-seafood restaurant. The murals are nice.