Tag Archives: Georgia Agriculture

Hay & Stock Barn, Montgomery County

Located on an historic farm with several surviving tenant houses, this is an unusual barn. I’m not sure why it has the gate at the front.

Cabbage Field, Toombs County

When most people think of cabbage in Georgia, they probably think of Cabbage Patch dolls. But cabbage is actually a big crop in the state. According to the most recent statistics from Georgia Grown, 30,000 acres under production yielded over 61 million pounds in 2021. This field, near the Altamaha River, was about to be harvested when I drove by.

Square Silos, Pike County

Square silos are fairly uncommon nationwide but especially in the Deep South. They’re usually associated with the Upper Great Plains and Canadian Prairie Provinces; they’re often called grain elevators when built in this fashion. These photographs were made in 2016, so I hope these are still standing. If so, they’re rare resources and I’m glad to share them.

Central Hallway Farmhouse, Johnson County

This landmark farmhouse looks particularly good surrounded by the bright yellow blooms of canola [rapeseed].

Warehouse, Thomasboro

Built in the typical “shotgun” style, this was a storage warehouse for feed, seed, or something agricultural. It’s a great old building, obviously well built.

Peches Stand, Putnam County

The “PECHES” sign on U.S. Highway 441 near Rock Eagle has always caught my attention. I believe this produce stand was in business as far back as my college days in the early 1990s, and possibly long before that.* The owners have obviously repainted the sign, and I’m sure they know by now that “peaches” is misspelled, but everyone has gotten so used to it that they wouldn’t have it any other way. It truly is a landmark of the area.

It turns out the well-loved stand has been open in one incarnation or another since the 1950s, and, yes, the misspelling is intentional, at least at this point. Some suggested Peches was the owner’s surname, but I never found anything to support this.

Log Tobacco Barn, Long County

This barn likely dates to the 1930s [perhaps 1920s], when tobacco production became a larger sector of the commercial agricultural economy in Georgia. Before that time, production was scattered and more specialized. An interesting feature of several tobacco barns I’ve documented in Long County is their height, which is notably shorter than most barns found elsewhere in Georgia. I’m unsure as to the reason for this.

Rigdon Farms Pecan Station Sign, 1950s, Peach County

This roadside landmark on U.S. Highway 341 is a remnant of a time when pecan stands, inspired by Stuckey’s, were popular stops for travelers. This sign identified Rigdon’s Pecan Station. A 1950s postcard for the business noted that they sold candies, novelties, and souvenirs, and of course, fresh pecans. At the time, a five-pound box of Schleys (papershells) was $3, five pounds of Stuarts and Success were $2.75, and five pounds of the largest papershell variety at the time, Mahans, would cost you a whopping $3.50. Coming from a “pecan family” myself, it’s one of my favorite signs in Georgia.

Elisha Winn House, Circa 1812, Dacula

The Elisha Winn House was built about 1812 in what was then Jackson County, and is perhaps the oldest extant house in the Atlanta metro area. Winn, who was a Justice of the Inferior Court, purchased the land, with Roger and Elijah Pugh, in 1809. It was part of a 7300 acre tract bordered by the Apalachee River. It became part of Gwinnett County on 15 December 1818, when the Georgia legislature created the counties of Gwinnett, Walton, and Hall, in part from Jackson County, as well as from former Indian lands.

The property is also significant as the first de facto center of government in Gwinnett County, hosting the Inferior Court and the first county elections. A barn on the grounds [no longer extant] hosted the Superior Court. Elisha Winn served as a judge of the Inferior Court from 1820-1825. He also served as a state senator for Gwinnett County in 1826, and a state representative in 1830, 1833, and 1837.

Lawrenceville was established as the Gwinnett County seat in 1821 and the Winns relocated there circa 1824.

Historic Structures Relocated to the Elisha Winn Property

Several structures representative of 19th and early-20th-century history in Gwinnett County have been relocated to the Winn property over the years. A representative mule barn [built in another county in 1917], can be seen in the background of the photo below.

Old Lawrenceville Jail, 1820s

The first jail in Gwinnett County was located on the Winn property but was demolished in 1933 by Jack Sims, who owned it at the time, and his employee Amos Hutchins, who lived most of his life on the old Winn place. As part of a collection of historical buildings, the old Lawrenceville jail [above], built in the 1820s and similar to the original jail, was relocated here for preservation. [Moravian missionaries who refused to get permits to live in Cherokee territory were briefly held in this structure before being transferred to a larger jail in Walton County].

Walnut Grove Schoolhouse, 1875

Typical of rural one-room schoolhouses of the era, the Walnut Grove school was originally located near Walnut Grove Church and the Methodist Campground. It was donated to the Gwinnett Historical Society in 1986 and opened for tours in 1988.

Cotton House, Early 20th Century

Structures of this type would have been present on working cotton plantations and farms in late-19th and early-20th century Gwinnett County. This example was donated to the historical society in 2001.

Alfred R. Clack Blacksmith Shop, Circa 1910

Dr. Donald S. Bickers, who also donated the cotton house, donated this structure to the historical society in 2000. It was built circa 1910 by his grandfather, Alfred R. Clack, who used it until late in his life. He died in 1948 and Dr. Bickers kept the structure in good condition.

National Register of Historic Places [Elisha Winn House, excluding other structures]

S. B. Vaughters Dairy Barn, 1947, DeKalb County

DeKalb County was still largely rural and one of the leading dairy counties in Georgia in 1947 when S. B. Vaughters built this barn to house Jersey cows at his farm, one of the most successful in the area. It later housed Angus cattle and horses, before being sold to the state for perpetual preservation in 2002. Restored in 2018, the barn is located on Panola Mountain State Park and is part of the Arabia Mountain National Heritage Area.

Arabia Mountain National Heritage Area