Tag Archives: Georgia Tin Buildings

Garage, Chester

I presume this was a garage or utility barn of some kind.

Turner’s Store, Four Points

This general/grocery store once also had gasoline pumps out front and would have been an essential stop for farmers and others in this section of southern Jenkins County.

Dottie Leatherwood, who has been a friend of Vanishing Georgia for a long time, writes: My grandfather, R.L. “Boss” Turner, owned that little country store from the 20s until, I think the 60s. I have his ledger books from the 20s and 30s. So interesting. I think the original building burned and they rebuilt. My grandparents lived across from the Elam Baptist church… I have so many fond memories of Four Points and wandering all over the fields and woods as a child.Betty Bennett ran the store during the 80s-90s. I’m not sure who ran it during the 70s but it was open because I remember going there as a child.

Fickling Mill, Taylor County

I’ve not been able to locate much information about Fickling Mill, but it’s definitely one of the best-loved landmarks in the area. The tin building (pictured above) was not part of the original mill, which had its origins in the 19th century. A two-story wooden structure was originally located to the right of the spillway on Patsiliga Creek but either burned or was torn down at some point in the history of the site.

It’s my understanding that the mill was established by Major William Hampton Fickling (1834-1907), Company C 59th Regiment Georgia Volunteer Infantry. Major Fickling was a Justice of the Peace and served Taylor County in the general assembly.

Seasonal Peach Workers’ Housing, 1910s, Lee Pope

A sign identifies this amazing survivor as the Lee Pope Hotel, though it was actually housing for Pearson Farms’ seasonal peach workers.

All the structures of the Lee Pope Fruit Farm should be included in the National Register of Historic Places as an important example of a 20th century Georgia peach farm.

Commissary, 1910s, Lee Pope

Around 1910, the Pearson family purchased the tremendous Lee Pope Fruit Farm and its peach packing operation here. It included numerous tenant houses, this commissary, a “hotel” which housed seasonal workers (really a dormitory), a packing house (now gone), and numerous barns and sheds. At one time, the Pearson peaches were branded “Big 6”. The family’s long-term preservation of this property provides an important historic lesson of the importance of the peach industry in this section of Middle Georgia and she be commended.

Bo Ray’s Store, Telfair County

Thanks to Royce Neal for the identification. He notes: (this) was Max “Bo” Ray, Sr’s, store. He was our barber and a mechanic/handyman for the community.

Painted Tin Building, Rayle

This building is sided with tin false brick siding which was painted at one time. I’m unsure of its use; the lack of windows on the side would indicate it wasn’t a residence, but it’s possible they were covered when the building was sided.

Tin Storefront, Rayle

Warehouses, Rayle