Sharpe Farmhouse, 1880s, Alston

Kate Moses writes: The house was built by the Sharpe Family. The house and the land surrounding it is still owned by descendants of the family. The “Farm” has many surrounding barns and tenant houses. The inside of the home has not been updated since the early 1900’s. Wesley Odom adds that the house was built in the 1880s.

An historic commissary and barn are also present on the property.


 

9 thoughts on “Sharpe Farmhouse, 1880s, Alston

  1. Kate Moses

    The house was built by the Sharpe Family. The house and the land surrounding it is still owned by descendants of the family. The “Farm” has many surrounding barns and tenant houses. The inside of the home has not been updated since the early 1900’s.

    Reply
    1. Donna S Crowther

      I am a Sharpe descendant. My daddy was raised in the area and when he retired he returned to the area of Uvalda. I grew up in Jacksonville, Florida, though. He left the area of Georgia when he enlisted in the Army, and his parents divorced.

      Reply
      1. Casey Brown

        Hello Donna,
        I came across this photo when looking for history of the Sharpe family in Alston, GA. My husband is Adam Sharpe. He is the son of Thomas Sharpe, and grandson of Dick Sharpe. Dick Sharpe was raised in that house by his mother, Mae Sharpe and her father, Dr. Sharpe (I’m not sure of his first name). Mae was widowed while pregnant (1930) and raised Dick with the help of her father. Mae kept her maiden name “Sharpe” and passed it on to Dick. Mae and Dick eventually moved to South Florida where he married Betty Sharpe and had 3 children: Ronald, Linda and Thomas Sharpe. My husband Adam is one of 3 of Tom Sharpe’s children. We are driving to Alston from Ft Lauderdale for Dick’s funeral tomorrow. He was a great man, who raised great men. I’m fascinated to learn more of the Sharpe family history.

      2. Keith Jihnson

        Me too. My grandmother was Alma Sharpe Johnson. I live in Jacksonville as well. Most of my family still lives in Alston, Ga

  2. Martha Barnes

    It is such a treat to open my e-mail and see these wonderful photos that bespeak of Georgia’s varied history. How wonderful that you chronicle these oft-time forgotten buildings areas, etc. Congrats to you!

    Reply

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