White Chimney River, McIntosh County

Originating in swampland east of Young Man Road in northern McIntosh County, the White Chimney River [also referred to as White Chimney Creek] flows southerly for several miles before joining the Sapelo River. I haven’t located an origin for the name, but would presume it to be related to an early house or other landmark with white chimneys. Seems logical, but who knows…

The White Chimney River is surrounded by marsh and hammock on both sides for most of its brief course.

This landscape is typical of estuaries along the Atlantic seaboard.

In the southeast, they generally feature palmettos, oaks, and cedars.

A web of smaller creeks feed into the river from all directions.

Like the rivers they support, they are dependent on the tides.

These estuaries are integral to the abundance of marine life that attracts fishermen to the region.

This floating dock is located at Cooper’s Point, now part of a residential development bordering the White Chimney River. It’s a private dock, but anyone can access the river at the White Chimney Creek Boat Ramp on Shellman Bluff Road. The river is particularly known for its abundance of Spotted Seatrout. Croaker is also common.

Oysters are also dependent on the estuarine environment and are quite abundant along the banks of the White Chimney River.

2 thoughts on “White Chimney River, McIntosh County

  1. Sharon

    I agree with Judy. Amazing photos of wild nature. McIntosh County certainly has a lot of rivers. This treasure must be protected! I’d like to visit the area, but I do my traveling vicariously these days.

    Reply
  2. Judy Braswell-VanScoy

    How awesome is this place called McIntosh County! Never in all my 76 years of living in various parts of Georgia have I ever seen such natural beauty. Thank you for capturing on film what I believe to be a unique treasure.

    Reply

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