Tag Archives: Georgia Mineral Springs

Lifsey Springs, Georgia

This general store was once a busy place, when the pool at Lifsey Spring, located across the highway, was a popular site. Like other warm mineral springs in Georgia, it is purported to have healing qualities for a host of maladies. And it just might. I’m not judging. Rev. R. W. Rogers noted in his 1922 History of Pike County: …There is quite a little village at Lifsey. Mr. W. E. Storey runs a mercantile and family grocery business. There are a number of cottages occupied during the hot months and the swimming pools are crowded with bathers. The old swimming pool survives, and the last I heard, was being rehabilitated itself.

This store is obviously of 20th century construction, but a post office named “Lifsey’s Store” operated in the area from 1878-1891. The name was simplified to “Lifsey” in 1891, and that post office was in operation from 1891-1907. It is technically still known as Lifsey today. The road through here is now known as Lifsey Springs Road, because Georgia seems to have a desire to make place names plural, for some reason.

Cave Entrance, 1930s, Cave Spring

This structure, built of local stone by the Works Progress Administration in the 1930s, marks the entrance to the limestone cave which gives the community its name. Two million gallons flow daily from the source, which has been a landmark since long before the establishment of the town in 1832.

In 1931 Dr. J. B. Rolater deeded the cave and 29 adjacent acres to the people of Cave Spring for use as a public park. In the early days local residents were allowed to tour the cave for free, while tourists were charged ten cents.

Rolater Park Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Indian Springs General Merchandise

I believe this is now an antique store.

White Sulphur Springs, Meriwether County

On the winding drive between Harris City and Pine Mountain I came across this site, which immediately caught my attention. Research led me to the story of one of old Georgia’s most famous health resorts, White Sulphur Springs. Thanks to the efforts of Steven Stewart, the present owner, it’s being restored. Apparently, it had stood abandoned for many years.

Like the other mineral springs which dot Meriwether County, White Sulphur Springs has a water whose quality has legions of devotees. To those it’s helped with all sorts of ailments, its healing powers are real. Mr. Stewart told Aaron Lake, “I can’t say whether it has medicinal properties, but these people have experienced it.” I believe Mr. Stewart has plans to bottle the water in the future.

In its prime, White Sulphur Springs boasted a luxury hotel, which burned down in 1948, but a few cabins and the pavilion remain. An obvious love of history has motivated Mr. Stewart to save what he can on this historic property. Notables such as John D. Rockefeller, J. P. Morgan, George Vanderbilt, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Jackie Kennedy were among the many celebrities who visited here.

I’m presently unaware of the progress of the restoration, but this is private property. My photos were made from the right of way. I just couldn’t pass by without stopping.