Tag Archives: © Brian Brown/Vanishing Media

Baron-York Building, Circa 1875, Clarkesville

Built circa 1875, this is one of two 19th-century commercial buildings surviving in downtown Clarkesville. It is named for V. C. Baron’s Feed & Seed and M. C. York’s dry goods store.

Clarkesville Downtown Square Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Habersham County Courthouse, 1964, Clarkesville

This Mid-Century Modern structure, now known as the “old county courthouse”, is slated for redevelopment, having been sold by the county circa 2019. It replaced a much more traditional 1898 courthouse and has been widely despised by the community since its construction. The clock tower was added in 1983 but did nothing to appease the building’s legion of detractors. A new court complex was in use by 2013.

Burns-Sutton House, 1901, Clarkesville

This Eclectic/Folk Victorian home was built by local master carpenters Rusk and Cornelius Church for Dr. J. K. Burns. Upon Dr. Burns’s death in 1924, the house was inherited by his daughter, Pauline Sutton, wife of Superior Court judge and Clarkesville mayor I. H. Sutton. Later incarnations include a bed and breakfast and law office.

Washington-Jefferson Street Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

English Vernacular Revival Cottage, 1942, Clarkesville

Washington-Jefferson Street Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Edwards-Tatum House, 1932, Clarkesville

This innovative cross-gable Craftsman cottage is a nice example of the variations of the style.

Washington-Jefferson Street Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Tallulah Point Overlook, 1920s, Rabun County

This well-loved tourist stop was known as Harvey’s Famous Overlook from at least the 1920s [some sources say 1912] until the 1980s.

It undoubtedly hosted millions of visitors in its long history. This vintage postcard likely dates to the late 1930s. [Public domain image]

It was next known as Tallulah Point and closed in 1989. It reopened as Tallulah Point Overlook in 1994.

In 2020, the shop relocated to downtown Tallulah Falls, signalling the end of an era, but not of the business.

Tallulah Gorge, Rabun County

Tallulah Gorge is a nearly thousand-foot-deep canyon which follows the Tallulah River for two miles resulting in one of the most beautiful natural areas in Georgia. The spectacular site is accessed at Tallulah Gorge State Park and is a mecca for outdoor recreation enthusiasts. I didn’t have much time when I was here, but even a visit of a couple of hours is one of the most rewarding trips in Georgia.

The first thing you’ll see if you plan on the strenuous descent to the Hurricane Falls suspension bridge, is L’Eau d’Or Falls, actually a series of several smaller falls. It’s a mere 350 feet below.

A Last Look at the Georgia Guidestones

After hearing the news of the destruction of the Georgia Guidestones in the early morning hours of 6 July 2022, I decided to revisit my photographs of the place. I’ve talked to people from Elberton and most just thought of them as a curiosity, but they were a tourist attraction; how much impact they actually had on the community in this regard has always been up for debate.

They also fed conspiracy theories, most recently highlighted by gubernatorial candidate Kandiss Taylor (3.4% of the vote in the 2022 Republican primary) who declared them “satanic” and made their removal a tenet of her candidacy.

Elberton mayor Daniel Graves recently told Stephen Fowler, in an interview on NPR’s Morning Edition: “[the] county is a solidly conservative and religiously observant, so outside voices claiming Satan’s hold on the stones don’t add up. “Our view of righteousness is not an Almighty God that needs zealots to do his dirty work and destruction,” Graves said. “That’s hatred … all the dynamite in the world can’t change a man’s heart.”

The only controversy regarding this relatively plain monument when it was unveiled on 22 March 1980 had to do with its origins and the identity of its mysterious patron. The man chose his pseudonym, R. C. Christian, because of his faith, but nothing else was ever revealed. Perhaps that’s what helped feed growing theories regarding the “New World Order” and satanism over time.

Occupying the highest point in Elbert County, the Guidestones were sometimes referred to as America’s Stonehenge, even though Stonehenge was laid out in a circular fashion and the Guidestones formed an “x”. There only similarity to Stonehenge was in their use as a sort of celestial sundial.

Elberton is known as the Granite Capital of the World, and is a charming small town. Personally, I prefer the area’s architectural gems, but I think it will be a challenge to draw people to the area on that aspect alone.

As Elberton Star editor Rose Scoggins told NPR: “I do think that we will slowly start to see just how big of an impact they had, because it will affect our tourism…I think we will unfortunately see that decline.

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) hasn’t released any updates recently, but they do have video footage of the vehicle that was at the site just before the explosive device was detonated. Elbert County intends to prosecute anyone responsible.

Two slabs were destroyed in the initial explosion and the GBI took out the remaining stones as a safety measure. For now, to my knowledge, there aren’t plans to replace the Guidestones.

Fortune Teller’s House, Harris Neck

I made these photos in 2009; no one was living here when I was in the neighborhood earlier this summer. As a self-service ice house, and home to a welder, it served an important purpose in this community of fishermen. The owners were obviously on the honor system, but to make sure customers were honest, a decorative skeleton kept an eye on things. The “answers” part of the sign always got my attention. I imagine it had something to do with the telling of fortunes. This is a bigger deal in these parts than many like to admit.

Live Oaks of Broadfield Plantation, Glynn County

The grove of Live Oaks (Quercus virginiana) marking the entrance to Hofwyl House and its dependencies at Hofwyl-Broadfield Plantation is one of the great natural public spaces on the Georgia coast.

While the structures are a significant resource, the real attraction for many are the oaks located all over the property. Individually, the trees are objects of awe and wonder; collectively, they’re a natural cathedral.

As is common with many Live Oaks on the coast, some specimens appear to have been uprooted.

These giants are miraculous in their curious ability to grow this way, often living and prospering for centuries.

Spanish Moss is the natural ornament most associated with the Live Oak, and it’s especially abundant here.

There’s also lots of Resurrection Fern (Pleopeltis polypodioides).

Some of these trees are estimated to be between 500-800 years old.

Two are members of the Louisiana Live Oak Society Tree Registry, which documents significant specimens throughout the Southeast.

National Register of Historic Places