Smith-Evans House, 1916, Bartow

Bartow Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Mount Zion A. M. E. Church, Davisboro

This is one of two historic African Methodist Episcopal congregations near Davisboro. I am unsure of the date, but I believe it’s a fairly early church.

Central Hallway Farmhouse, Washington County

Central Hallway Farmhouse, Washington County

This is an expanded central hallway form, likely added to as the family grew over time. It was a fairly common practice among rural homeowners at one time.

Middle Hill Schoolhouse, Washington County

Though I cannot locate a specific history, a state historical survey notes that this rural African-American schoolhouse near Warthen was built and administered by the adjacent Middle Hill Missionary Baptist Church. The survey lists a construction date of 1900, but I believe it may date to circa 1920.

The inward triangular entryway is a fascinating feature.

Single-Pen Tenant Farmhouse, Washington County

Unidentified Church, Washington County

St. James C. M. E. Church (Circa 1915) & Schoolhouse, Washington County

This historic Christian Methodist Episcopal congregation likely dates to the late 19th century. An architectural survey dates the church building to circa 1915. A cemetery is also located on the property.

Down a short lane from the chapel stands this one-room schoolhouse, typical of church-associated African-American communities in Georgia from the late-19th to the mid-20th century. This structure probably dates from 1910-1930.

Gabled-Ell Farmhouse, Washington County

This farmhouse is an important variation of a common form. It features an angled or corner porch. It’s possible I’ve seen one or two with this form in my years of documenting rural Georgia, but I can’t recall another example at the moment.

Berrien House, Circa 1791, Savannah

Considered one of Georgia’s most iconic houses, the Berrien House was built circa 1791 for Major John Berrien (1759-1815), a hero of the Revolutionary War.

Major Berrien left college in New Jersey to enlist in the American Revolution. Quickly rising through the ranks, he was commissioned Captain of the first Georgia Continental Brigade in 1777, under the command of Lachlan McIntosh. Berrien followed General McIntosh to Washington’s Headquarters and served, at age 18, as Brigadier Major of North Carolina Troops at Valley Forge and Monmouth. Washington is believed to have made his headquarters in Berrien’s ancestral New Jersey home, Rockingham, and may have written his Farewell Orders to the Armies from that location. The Berriens were close personal friends of General Washington. After the war, Berrien returned to Savannah with his family and became very prominent in local affairs. He was Collector of Customs and an alderman and also served as state treasurer at Louisville (1796-1799).

John Macpherson Berrien, by John Maier, 1870. Public Domain

Major Berrien’s son, John Macpherson Berrien (1781-1856), began the practice of law at Louisville in 1799. After service in the War of 1812, Berrien was elected to the Georgia senate and served as a United States senator from 1825-1829. From 1829-1831, he served as Andrew Jackson’s attorney general; from 1845-1852, he again served in the United States senate. Berrien County is named for him.

The home, which was in bad condition for many years, has been exquisitely restored by one of Berrien’s descendants, Andrew Berrien Jones, and is a wonderful example of preservation.

Savannah Historic District, National Historic Landmark