Tag Archives: Georgia Schoolhouses

Union School, Pike County

This one-room schoolhouse is located adjacent to Jones Grocery, between Lifsey Springs and Molena. It appears to date to the late-19th/early-20th century and had seven grades. Professor William Henry Reeves and Bessie Carter were the teachers for the 1922-1923 school year. It has been well-maintained and is a great example of a rural schoolhouse.

Union Chapel United Methodist Church, Circa 1858, & Union Chapel School, 1913

This vernacular Greek Revival church is among the oldest in Putnam County, and was built on land originally owned by the same man who owned the nearby Rock Eagle site. The historical marker placed by the congregation and the Eatonton-Putnam County Historical Society in 2001 gives a detailed history: On April 24, 1855, Irby Hudson Scott deeded to the trustees of a new newly organized and consolidated Methodist Episcopal group, three and three-quarter acres of land in the Tompkins District in Putnam County, Georgia. A church building was to be erected on the land. There had been a small church on nearby land owned by the Hearn family named Bethel Church. There was also a small church named Rock Chapel on what used to be known as “the ridge road,” and now called the Uncle Remus U.S. Highway 441. Because the membership of each of the two churches was small, they united into one larger congregation and built a house of worship on the land offered for the purpose by Mr. Scott. These early members built well and today the building is still in excellent condition. No one now living knows where the lumber was milled but it is all the very best heart pine lumber, nowhere to be found today. The sills and framework are hand-hewn and pinned. The doors and triple-sash windows are said to have been made in Augusta, Georgia, and hauled overland to the building site. The lumber used to make the pews and the door and window facing was all hand planed. The pulpit Bible was presented in 1855 and the first pastor was the Rev. Henry Morton. As early as 1867, there was a Sunday school at Union Chapel. Mr. Cullen S. Credille was superintendent of the male members and Mrs. Mary Scott was superintendent of the female members. Many years ago the orientation of the interior was changed with the pulpit and pews being reversed. Originally, the pulpit was before the high windows between the two front doors, and was mounted by steps. A new pulpit and communion rail was installed at the opposite end of the building and a center door was removed and the opening closed.

The adjacent schoolhouse is a landmark, as well. More history from the marker notes: On August 13, 1913, a delegation of 25 gentlemen from the Reid’s Crossroad community went before the Putnam County Board of Education and requested that a better school be built in the area. The board voted to build a school at Union Chapel. The builder was Mr. Robert E. Vining and the school opened in November 1913 and was in continuous operation until county school consolidation forced its closure on May 25, 1946. The school’s first teacher was Miss Fannie Mae Jones. It has been used since as Sunday school space by the church. For generations United Chapel Church and school have been important parts of this community.

Talking Rock Schoolhouse, 1877

A sign for the Talking Rock Schoolhouse Teaching Museum notes that the school was established in the community in 1857. The schoolhouse seen here was built in Ludville in 1877 and moved to Talking Rock in 1882. It was restored by retired teachers in 1998.

Mars Hill School, 1873, Cobb County

Though it has been absorbed by Acworth today, Mars Hill was once a rural community in Cobb County, centered around a Presbyterian church, cemetery, and this schoolhouse. The schoolhouse was deeded to Cobb County in 1902 and remained in use until 1938. Today, it is used by the Mars Hill Memorial Association, the group charged with overseeing the adjacent cemetery.

Ben Hill School, Upson County

The architecture of this rural schoolhouse, between The Rock and Thomaston, led me to think it was a Rosenwald, but it just has similar features. It has been identified by Cynthia Jennings as the Ben Hill School. It is very endangered. It was likely built between 1910-1930 to serve African-American children in the community.

Johnstonville School, 1915, Lamar County

The Johnstonville School is a landmark of rural education and an excellent example of the use of the Craftsman style in public architecture.

The school closed in 1945 [one source dates the closure to 1939]. It serves as the Johnstonville Community Clubhouse today.

The Johnstonville Women’s Club was organized in 1924 and helped oversee the care of the school and were involved in the preservation of the historic structure for many years.

Johnstonville-Goggins Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

One-Room Schoolhouse, Emanuel County

A sign on the back of this structure identifies it as a school. It’s a great example of rural school architecture of the late 19th and early 20th centuries and has been nicely preserved.

Middle Hill Schoolhouse, Washington County

Though I cannot locate a specific history, a state historical survey notes that this rural African-American schoolhouse near Warthen was built and administered by the adjacent Middle Hill Missionary Baptist Church. The church was operating a school as early as the 1870s though this structure dates to the early 20th century.

The inward triangular entryway is a fascinating feature.

St. James C. M. E. Church (Circa 1915) & Schoolhouse, Washington County

This historic Christian Methodist Episcopal congregation likely dates to the late 19th century. An architectural survey dates the church building to circa 1915. A cemetery is also located on the property.

Down a short lane from the chapel stands this one-room schoolhouse, typical of church-associated African-American communities in Georgia from the late-19th to the mid-20th century. This structure probably dates from 1910-1930.

Rosenwald School, 1927, Ailey

This Rosenwald School was built to accommodate three teachers at a cost of $3650. The effort to bring the facility to Ailey was largely the work of Shelton Mincey (1865-1930), a community leader who served as a delegate to the Republican National Conventions of 1912 and 1920. Since its restoration, the school has served as a community center for Ailey.