Naylor School, Lowndes County

I would estimate that this structure, which likely served all grades, was built in the 1910s or 1920s.

Rosenwald School, 1927, Ailey

This Rosenwald School was built to accommodate three teachers at a cost of $3650. The effort to bring the facility to Ailey was largely the work of Shelton Mincey (1865-1930), a community leader who served as a delegate to the Republican National Conventions of 1912 and 1920. Since its restoration, the school has served as a community center for Ailey.

Allen’s Invalid Home, Milledgeville

This is one of two nearly identical structures that were later built on the site, and is the only surviving remnant of the sanitarium. From limited sources, I have preliminarily identified this as the administration building and Dr. Allen’s residence, though it has also been identified as the dining hall and women’s building.

In 1890, Dr. Henry Dawson Allen, Sr., bought the old Oglethorpe University property in the Midway community and in 1891 opened a private hospital for chronic incurable cases, likely as an alternative to the less personal care offered at the nearby State Lunatic Asylum.

Allen’s Invalid Home for the Treatment of Nervous Diseases was among the first private psychiatric institutions in the Southeastern United States. Dr. Allen was very progressive and bought up as much of the surrounding land, on which were grown a great variety of vegetables and stock for the use of the institution. Patients weren’t required to work but could if they chose to. Dr. Allen’s sons, Dr. H. D. Allen, Jr., and Dr. Edwin Whitaker Allen, Sr., eventually practiced alongside their father.

Rear of the building, showing the addition.

Abandoned Interiors of Allen’s Invalid Home

Please note that this is private property. I had permission to photograph. If you wish to photograph you may wish to make a donation to the Maranatha Mission, which oversees the property.

Restoration of the Kinlaw Rosenwald School, Camden County

Marshall Glover

While photographing in Camden County with Cynthia Jennings yesterday, I met Mr. Marshall Glover. Mr. Glover is leading the work of restoring the historic Kinlaw Rosenwald School, which was built in 1921. The formal education of African-American children in Kinlaw began in a one-room schoolhouse built on the site in 1896.

The African-American community of Kinlaw was very progressive and embraced better education for its children. Upon learning of the existence of the Rosenwald grants from Matilda Harris, Camden County’s supervisor of black schools, the people of Kinlaw began exploring the possibility of replacing their schoolhouse with a better facility. They raised $909 and with matching contributions and grants began construction on this structure in 1920, with the first classes beginning in 1921. The school offered instruction for children from first to seventh grade and was one of three Rosenwald facilities in the county. Kinlaw is the only one that survives today.

Mr. Glover told me that his father and grandfather both attended the school and that he was glad to be doing the restoration as a way of honoring them. He noted that he has been working for over a year and spent much of that time caulking the tongue-and-groove paneling. He pointed out that the excellent material and construction of the school has been evident during the restoration, with much of the work being cosmetic. He stated that there were some parts of the floor that were compromised due to leaks in the old roof, but they are getting to that work now. With a team of volunteers, he has done an excellent job.

Please consider a contribution to continue this important work. Secure donations can be made here.

63rd AAF Flying Training Detachment Airbase, 1941, Douglas

Administration Building

Through the efforts of Wesley Newman Raymond and Robert Richardson, the Raymond-Richardson Aviation School was established at this site in 1939, to teach basic flight skills to college students.

WWII Flight Training Museum [Barracks 7]

With America’s entrance into World War II in 1941, the school became the 63rd Flight Training Detachment Airbase.

Barracks

During the war, several thousand men learned to fly here and went on to serve all over the world.

Barracks

Many local women provided support as clerical and food service employees, as well as civilian dispatchers and aircraft mechanics.

Classroom

The based was decommissioned in 1944 and the hangers have been incorporated into the old airfield, now known as Douglas Municpal Airport (KDHQ).

Hospital

The property, now owned by the city of Douglas, has been used for numerous purposes since the end of the war.

Gatehouse

Through the efforts of local enthusiasts, Barracks 7 is now home to the WWII Flight Training Museum, which has limited hours. The property can be accessed at any time.

Friendship Schoolhouse, 1850s, Sumter County

The only reference I can locate regarding this structure is from the old Friendship Baptist Church minute book. It was noted on 23 January 1864 that the schoolhouse and adjacent five acres were purchased by the congregation for $500. Considering the church was built in 1857, it is possible that the schoolhouse predates it. The portico is obviously a later addition.

Liberty Methodist Church, Marion County

I first identified this historic structure, south of Mauk, as a schoolhouse, largely due to the fact that it still has traces of red paint. But George Woodall, who grew up in Mauk, relates that it was Liberty Methodist Church. It’s definitely endangered and will likely not survive much longer without intervention.

 

Bartow County Courthouse, 1902, Cartersville

This courthouse replaced an 1869 courthouse [still standing] and was designed by Georgia’s most prolific courthouse architect, J. W. Golucke.

National Register of Historic Places

Militia District #851 Courthouse, 1890s, Euharlee

Euharlee was a part of Militia District #851, and this historic courthouse was the de facto center of justice in the rural community. It was nicely restored after years of neglect.

Hearn Academy, 1910, Cave Spring

Hearn Academy was established by the Baptists as the Manual Labor School [a permanent school of high order] in 1838, to teach boys agricultural and other life skills. Tuition was paid by work on area farms. A generous endowment from the estate of Lott O. Hearn in 1846, realized from the posthumous sale of 12 slaves, gave the school the name Hearn Manual Labor School.

Reorganized as a more comprehensive institution in 1903, it was renamed Hearn Academy. After a fire, the original school building was replaced with the present structure in 1910. It closed in 1925, with the rise of public state-funded schools in the area.

It remains an anchor of historic Cave Spring and is used for a number of public and private events.

Rolater Park Historic District, National Register of Historic Places